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Bio


A Bit About  Tess

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Bio


A Bit About  Tess

 

BIO

Tess was introduced to the snowboarding world at the age of two, sliding down a hill in her back yard in Mackenzie, BC, Canada. When she was 5, Tess's parents gave her and her brother the choice of moving to Mexico, a life on the beach, or the mountain life at Big White Ski Resort. The choice was easy. Tess entered her first race at Big White when she was six years old, coming in second place only behind her brother.

At the age of 14, snowboarding took off in a big way for Tess when she was picked up by the BC Snowboardcross team, and boardercross became her top priority. Tess committed time for training on and off snow, got more opportunities to travel for competition, and began to do most of her school work on the road.

After 4 successful years on the BC team, claiming the North American title and winning back to back Jr. National Championships, she was able to take another leap towards her dreams. In the summer of 2014 Tess joined her mentors and was announced as a new member of the Canadian National Snowboardcross Team.

Training alongside Canadian legends, Maëlle Ricker and Dominique Moltais, Tess got to push her riding to new levels and has been continuously moving up the ladder ever since. In the last few seasons Tess earned herself a number of top ten results on the World Cup circuit and has stepped onto the World Cup podium a few times in the Team event.  

After 8 years of commitment to snowboard cross Tess achieved her lifelong dream by attending the 2018 Winter Olympics in PeyongChang! She raced her heart out for Canada and as a first time Olympian tried not to let the pressures of this massive event affect her focus. Feeling her countries support Tess rode away with the top Canadian result, and an experience of a lifetime! Eager for another chance to step on the Olympic stage, she is continuing to work hard and push her limits so in three years time she will able contribute to the Canadian medal count in 2022.

 
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Highlights


Highlights


CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

  • 2018 9th Winter Olympic Games, PyeongChang, Korea

  • 2018 1st National Championships

  • 2018 3rd World Cup Team Event, Veysonnaz, Switzerland

  • 2018 2nd World Cup Team Event, Moscow, Russia

  • 2018 7th World Cup, La Molina, Spain

  • 2017 3rd World Cup Team Event, Veysonnaz, Switzerland

  • 2017 6th World Cup, Bansko, Bulgaria

  • 2016 1st National Championships

  • 2016 6th World Cup, Feldberg, Germany

  • 2016 8th world Cup, Baqueira Beret, Spain

  • 2015 14th World Championships, Kreischberg, Austria

  • 2015 3rd North American cup, Big White Canada

  • 2014/13 Jr. Canadian National Champ, Big White, Canada

  • 2013 North American Overall Title

  • 15 Career Wins (all levels)

FOR MORE RACE HISTORY CLICK HERE

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Live to Ride


Live to Ride


Snowboard Cross


Snowboard Cross


Boardercross

Boardercross also known as Snowboard cross, is a snowboard competition in which six (sometimes four if snow conditions do not allow for a big enough track) competitors race down a course. These courses are comprised of many different features. Starting with a quick technical section out of the gate, the course moves into various styles of jumps, berms, rollers, drops, tables, all throughout steep and flat sections. This is all designed to challenge the riders' ability to stay in control while maintaining maximum speed. It is not uncommon for racers to lose control, taking themselves out or colliding with other riders mid-race.

Competition format starts with a time-trial run, one by one the riders race against the clock, trying to beat their competitors times to make it into “finals” or “heats” the next day. The main event is 6 man heats, which are stacked together based on their fastest time from the day before. Only the top three (or two if its a four man) in each heat move on to the next round, as the field gets smaller the riding gets more competitive with everyone fighting to get into the big finals, where they will then have the chance to take home a medal.

 
White bib.

White bib.

Boardercross was created by two tv producers (one who was an avid snowboarder) who needed a new segment for their show on Fox TV called Greg Stump's World of Extremes. They pitched the idea which was quickly approved and shortly after the first ever boardercross course was built in 1991 here on the west coast of Canada. After the sport had its tv debut, resorts started building courses and hosting competitions across canada, the US and Australia. The sport continued to spread and gain popularity, even making it into the gaming world with video game SSX selling over 8 mill copies.

Black bib.

Black bib.

With the growth of the sport itself, these athletes become stronger, faster and more adaptable every year. Capturing the attention of other snowboarders and viewers all over the wold, and for good reason. Boardercross has it all, big jumps, a variety of everchanging features, high speed which has the result of high consequence, and 6 extremely competitive athletes duking it out at the same time. To top it all off, these racers are out in the elements where you have to be prepared for anything; high winds, new snow, freezing temperatures or even heat, all of which affect the riders themselves and can change the snow they are on in minutes. Weather your watching from the side lines of strapped in and on course, this sport will have you fully captivated from start to finish with a lot of, uh-ohs, yahoos and screams in between.

Boardercross or snowboard cross?

You made have heard both terms when people are talking about this extreme sport, and although they are similar there is a story behind the difference. When it first came out to the world, the sport had been coined as boardercross. Steven Rechtschaffner had traveled around to the races hosted by other mountains to make sure the event created a positive, fun, safe and respectful atmosphere, qualities true to our sport. For these same reasons he denied the ski sanctioning body F.I.S. the rights to use the Boardercross name, as he shared the majority of snowboarders' belief that a ski sanctioning body should not be in charge of snowboarding events. Despite this, for the sport to become an Olympic event, they were told they must do so under F.I.S.. So in 2006 boardercross did just that and made it onto the homes of millions, at the Turin Olympic Games. Since then, the new name has become more common, leaving boardercross to sound like slang, even though the overwhelming majority of racers still refer to their sport by the original snowboarding term.